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Fri09202019

Posledná aktualizácia19:48:04

Insight into Slovak-Magyar Relations

altIn the book Insight into Slovak-Magyar Relations we are publishing articles, which present the Slovak position of their authors on this relationship. The authors of the articles met on 18 September 2009 for an expert seminar in the Institute of Slavonic Studies of Ján Stanislav of the Slovak Academy of Sciences.

The paper by the Norwegian author Egil Lejon was read in his absence. The participants in the seminar especially welcomed the presence of the minister of culture of the Slovak Republic Marek Maďarič, and another honoured guest - the Slovak writer from Hungary Gregor Papuček.

http://www.oslovma.hu/XXX/AngZborn.pdf

 


Contents

Introduction

Ladislav Deák

On the Reliability of the Hungarian Nationality Statistics from 1910

Anton Hrnko

Language is not only an Instrument of Communication. Casting of Doubt on Slovak - Causes and Consequences

Jozef Darmo

The Slovak Act on the State Language as Interpreted by the „Slovak” Press

Ján Doruľa

Magyaromania

Ján Kačala

Language Legislation from the Point of View of Linguistics

Ábel Kráľ

The Party of the Magyar Coalition (SMK) and the Act on the State Language

Viliam Jablonický

The Danger of extremist Videofilms and Views on Internet Pages and Computer Games

Marek Mihálik

The Act on the State Language in the Context of International Law

Elena Kačalová

The Need for an Amendment to the Act on the State Language

Gregor Papuček

The Fairytale Land of Hungary or Fairytales are Proliferating round us

Egil Lejon

Mastodon

altISBN: 978-80-969992-9-3

EAN: 9788096999293

Publisher: The Slovak Committee of Slavists,
The Institute of Slavonic Studies of Jan Stanislav
of The Slovak Academy of Sciences

Language: English

Format: 15.0x21.0 cm

Number of pages: 92

Year of publishing: 2009

Cover: paperback

http://www.oslovma.hu/XXX/AngZborn.pdf

Introduction

In the book Insight into Slovak-Magyar Relations we are publishing articles, which present the Slovak position of their authors on this relationship. The authors of the articles met on 18 September 2009 for an expert seminar in the Institute of Slavonic Studies of Ján Stanislav of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The paper by the Norwegian author Egil Lejon was read in his absence. The participants in the seminar especially welcomed the presence of the minister of culture of the Slovak Republic Marek Maďarič, and another honoured guest - the Slovak writer from Hungary Gregor Papuček. altThe seminar was organized by the Institute of Slavonic Studies of Ján Stanislav of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, the Slovak Language Department of the Philosophy Faculty of the University of Constantine the Philosopher in Nitra, the Ministry of Culture of the Slovak Republic and the Language Department of Matica slovenská. In the present tense situation in Slovak-Magyar relations, which Magyar figures from various fields of political, social and scientific life in Slovakia and Hungary have artificially intensified and are still sharpening, the authors of the papers point to the danger of this escalation. Some of our authors rely on their long-term research into Slovak-Magyar relations and in the spirit of Kollár's wise statement that „the life of the present has its roots in the past and can only be explained from it” they point to the genesis of the present Magyar views on Slovakia and the Slovaks. These views, a large part of which are absurdly anachronistic in present-day Europe, are deeply rooted in Magyar society and have been successfully cultivated, maintained and nourished for a long time. They are a constant source of tension in Slovak-Magyar relations. To the framework of specific attitudes, it is also necessary to add the „objective news” from the daily SME, which is Slovak only in the sense that it is published in Slovakia and in the Slovak language. In its edition from 29 September 2009, it not only accuses the organizers of the expert seminar of lack of objectivity, because they did not invite Magyars to a presentation of the Slovak point of view, it also give a „cadre profile” of the „nationalist” participants in the seminar. It draws data about their participation in the seminar only from brief information given to the press. Especially humanly offensive is the reference to the „cadre profile” of our honoured guest from Hungary, who is said to be „mentioned among the authors on the web-site prop.sk, which publishes anti-Semitic texts.” I believe that all those, who look at this book will find in it useful information, facts and evidence shedding light on the Slovak view of the problem of Slovak - Magyar relations.

Ján Doruľa (edit.)

http://www.oslovma.hu/XXX/AngZborn.pdf